• Sydney Australia - credit Jackie Appleton

South Island of New Zealand

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For those with limited time to explore New Zealand, focusing on one island only is a great way to reduce the amount of time spent travelling, and allow more time to be spent exploring this beautiful country.

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South Island – New Zealand

 

Day 1:   Christchurch

Day 3:   Kaikoura

Day 4:   Blenheim

Day 6:   Abel Tasman National Park

Day 9:   Punakaiki

Day 10:   Arthurs Pass

Day 12:   Fox Glacier and Franz Josef

Day 14:   Wanaka

Day 15:   Queenstown

Day 17:   Te Anau

Day 19:   Stewart Island

Day 21:   The Catlins

Day 23:   Dunedin

Day 25:   Lake Tekapo

Day 27:   Akaroa

Day 29:   Depart Christchurch

 

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Description

 

The south island offers dramatic mountain scenery with the Southern Alps running north to south, and with pristine lakes, majestic glaciers, jagged peaks and deserted beaches. Add to this wildlife, birdlife and marine life along with friendly locals and a fascinating culture, and this island makes for a fantastic introduction to New Zealand.

Christchurch and Queenstown are the two key international airports on this island, and a looped route from either one will provide a comprehensive and diverse holiday.

Day 1: Christchurch

Begin your holiday in the city of Christchurch. Punt along the river, visit the botanical gardens or take a tram ride around the town centre. Unique attractions to pop up since the earthquakes include Re:Start – a shopping centre comprised of shipping containers, and the Cardboard Cathedral.

Two nights Christchurch

 

Day 3: Kaikoura

Collect a hire car and head north to Kaikoura. Located on the coast and jammed in between the mountains and the sea, Kaikoura is famous for its fish and chips and crayfish! It is also the place for whale watching – either by sea or from the air.

One night Kaikoura

Day 4: Blenheim

This area produces some excellent wines and many wineries are open for tastings. The Marlborough Sound and Queen Charlotte sound are both in this area and well worth exploring if you have the time.

Two nights Blenheim

Day 6: Abel Tasman National Park

Drive around to Abel Tasman. This northern tip of the South Island is so often overlooked, but it is one of our favourites.  It is here that you’ll see the crescent shaped beaches backed by lush greenery – easy to spend a full day in the park, using the water taxis to get about, and perhaps walking one of the many trails in the park.

Three nights Abel Tasman

Day 9: Punakaiki

Coming down the west coast, it is nice to break the journey with an overnight stop at Punakaiki. This is the home of the Pancake Rocks – a strange rock formation, and the overnight stop simply allows you to take your time as these roads are so scenic that you will simply have to keep stopping for more pictures.

One night Punakaiki

 Day 10: Arthurs Pass

Turning inland to the central spine of mountains that run through the South Island, this is alpine scenery at its very best.  There are plenty of walking opportunities in the area with stunning views all around.

Two nights Arthurs Pass

Day 12: Fox Glacier and Franz Josef

Returning to the west coast, the next place of interest are the two glaciers of Franz Josef and Fox Glacier. Take time to visit one or both glaciers, the beautiful Lake Matheson and the dramatic coast at Gillespie Beach.  From here also, you can take a sightseeing flight, with or without a glacier landing and hike, and hopefully good views of Mount Cook.

Two nights Fox Glacier

Day 14: Wanaka

The route to Wanaka takes you through the Haast Pass and past Lakes Wanaka and Hawea.  Simply beautiful – this little town is surrounded by mountains and is the Queenstown of yesteryear.  Where Queenstown has developed, Wanaka has remained delightfully small.

One night Wanaka

Day 15: Queenstown

Sitting on the shores of Lake Wakatipu, Queenstown is a sizeable town with activities for every adrenalin junkie!  Here you will find bungy jumping, sky diving, a luge and plenty more.  Much of the Lord of the Rings was filmed in this area, and although the sets had to be removed, the scenery will seem familiar!  For those not into extreme sports, a drive to Glenorchy is beautiful.

Two nights Queenstown

Day 17: Te Anau

Te Anau is the gateway to Fjordland National Park – for both Milford and Doubtful Sounds. For either, you can visit for a day, or take an overnight cruise. Of the two, Milford offers the more dramatic scenery but is busier. Doubtful Sound has fewer tourists and lovely scenery, but it’s not quite so dramatic.

Two nights Te Anau

Day 19: Stewart Island

At the very southern tip are areas of New Zealand that many never get to. Stewart Island is home to the only kiwi’s (the birds that is) to be found in the wild, and a must for birding enthusiasts. Access to the island is by ferry or by light aircraft – we suggest going by air as the ferry crossing can be quite choppy.

Two nights Stewart Island 

Day 21: The Catlins

The Catlins is the area in the far southeast corner of the South Island – a wild and remote corner for those whose idea of paradise is the absence of anyone else at all (or pretty well!) and with good opportunities to see wildlife such as Little Blue Penguins, Yellow Eyed Penguins, seals and sealions.

Two nights The Catlins

Day 23: Dunedin

Visited by many for its Scottish appeal and for the colony of albatross that call this home. This is a must for birders. There are a number of other attractions in the area including the Rail Trail – great for cycling. The Otago Peninsula is beautiful, and a stay here rather than in the city itself may appeal too.

Two nights Dunedin

Day 25: Lake Tekapo

This is the home of the Church of the Good Shepherd and the Collie Dog Memorial often features in brochures. This is also a great place for stargazing as it is a ‘designated dark sky’ area.

Two nights Lake Tekapo

Day 27: Akaroa

Located on the Banks Peninsula south east of Christchurch, this small town has a French feel to it and is a lovely place to relax for a day or two. From here, one can take a cruise to swim with wild Hector’s Dolphins – the smallest and rarest dolphin, which is endemic to New Zealand.

Two nights Akaroa

Day 29: Depart Christchurch

Depart Christchurch today to head home or to your next destination.

Fox Glacier – Credit Jim bell

Franz Josef Glacier Credit New Zealand Tourism

Queenstown – Credit Jim Bell

Rippon Vineyard-Lake Wanaka- credit David Wall

23 Nugget Point The Catlins- Credit Graeme Murray

Te Anau Milfor Sound – Credit 100% New Zealand

Arthurs Pass National Park Canterbury Credit Tourism New Zealand

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Lake Wanaka, New Zealand

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Treble Cone, The View – Picture Courtesy of Lake Wanaka Tourism.

With more of our clients heading to New Zealand for their holidays, it is worth mentioning some of the lesser known attractions that would fit in well with your tour. One such place is Lake Wanaka which should certainly be considered for your itinerary. As you leave the exciting west coast of South Island and head inland, Lake Wanaka will tempt you to stay a night or two at least.

Surrounded by the Southern Alps, which in the Southern Hemisphere winter makes Lake Wanaka one of the best skiing destinations, every view has a rugged mountain as a back drop. They also offer some wonderful hiking venues of differing difficulty and duration. If you would rather take the weight off your feet on your adventure, then consider a guided horse ride or quad bike tour.

The Lake itself also offers a wealth of activities such as kayaking, stand up paddling and sailing and it is a great location to just to relax with stunning views in every direction.

So why not talk to us about your New Zealand itinerary and how to include time at Lake Wanaka. Having travelled this far for your holiday, it pays to talk to an expert to ensure you do not miss any of the key attractions.

Take a look at our webpage for our New Zealand itinerary ideas or contact us direct on Tel: 01323 446550 or email: info@experienceholidays.co.uk

Lake Wanaka

Lake Wanaka – Picture courtesy of Jim Bell

Top Tips for New Zealand

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Photo courtesy of Angie Watson

Photo courtesy of Angie Watson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We’ve detailed below some of our top tips for New Zealand – useful points for anyone thinking of visiting this spectacular country.

 

  • Explore the North Island first, and the South Island second – the scenery will become better and more dramatic as you go.

 

  • Travel in New Zealand’s spring or autumn to avoid the crowds (the summer holidays there are usually throughout January and therefore visitor attractions tend to get busy).

 

  • Visit the far south of the South Island for great wildlife viewing opportunities such as fur seals, sea lions, albatross, yellow eyed penguin and little blue penguin all found in this region, and of course the elusive kiwi found on Stewart Island along with other endemic species.

 

  • Dig in the sand at low tide at Hot Water Beach on the Coromandel Peninsula and enjoy your own personal spa pool.

 

  • Plan your time carefully – We suggest at least four weeks to see the key highlights, or six weeks if you’d prefer a more comprehensive trip. If you’re limited to a shorter duration, choose one region and explore it well.

 

  • Stay in a variety of accommodation – New Zealand is fantastic for B&B’s, farmstays and boutique lodges, which provide a chance to meet the locals and learn about their way of life, rather than simply providing a place to lay your head.

 

  • Put on your hiking boots and go tramping for a few hours, a day or perhaps one of New Zealand’s famous multi-day Great Walks – you’ll find fantastic scenery and well marked trails whichever you choose.

 

  • For train enthusiasts, the Tranz Alpine is a must – cutting through the Southern Alps from Christchurch to Greymouth, and providing stunning vistas along the way.

 

  • Take an overnight cruise on Milford or Doubtful Sounds for a chance to experience the region with fewer crowds.

 

For more information, and for assistance planning a holiday to New Zealand, call us on 01323 446550, email us at info@experienceholidays.co.uk or see our website www.experienceholidays.co.uk.

South Island NZ

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Gateways to the South Island will be Christchurch, Queenstown or the ferry port of Picton in the north. The visitor arriving via Picton will be treated to the delightful scenery of Marlborough Sound – the myriad of islands and inlets that make up the Sound stand remote and beautiful against the sky. The Alpine range runs north/south through the spine of the Island, giving the dramatic contrasts between sea, rain forest and mountain on the western side. Abel Tasman in the north is delightful – explore on foot using the unique water taxis to drop you on a remote beach. Further south, the thriving towns of Queenstown, and lesser known Wanaka await your visit – rugged mountains cascading into the clear deep blue waters of a dozen lakes. 

The Fjordland National Park is a must on most wish lists – Milford and Doubtful Sounds should not be missed, and for the more intrepid, perhaps an overnight stay aboard the exploration vessels. The Catlins and Stewart Island at the Southern end complete the Island, remote and wild – and a paradise for birders. Finally, the east coast and the whales of Kaikoura, the remarkable pre-historic remains of the Canterbury area and the city of Christchurch. What are you waiting for?

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA
Credit Jim Bell Credit Jim Bell Credit Jim Bell
                    

New Zealand in 4 Weeks

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A comprehensive bespoke itinerary exploring both the North and South Islands. Four weeks in New Zealand provides time to explore most of the key attractions – and at a comfortable pace.

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New Zealand in 4 weeks

Four weeks in New Zealand provides time to explore most of the key attractions – and at a comfortable pace. The following plan provides an idea of how a bespoke or tailor made four week trip in New Zealand could take shape.

Day 1: Auckland

Day 3: Bay of Islands

Day 6: Coromandel

Day 8: Rotorua

Day 10: Napier

Day 12: Wellington

Day 14: Abel Tasman

Day 17: Punakaiki

Day 18: ArthursPass

Day 20: Fox Glacier

Day 22: Wanaka

Day 23: Te Anau

Day 25: Queenstown

Day 27: LakeTekapo

Day 28: Christchurch

Day 29: Depart New Zealand

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Description

Four weeks in New Zealand provides time to explore most of the key attractions – and at a comfortable pace. The following plan provides an idea of how a four week tailor made or bespoke holiday could take shape.

Day 1: Auckland

Most journeys will start in Auckland, enabling you to explore the NorthIsland first, followed by the South Island.  We usually suggest doing it in this order as both Islands are beautiful in their own way, but it is the South Island that offers the rugged dramatic scenery so often seen in photos and worth working up to!  Auckland is quite a large city by New   Zealand standards, and certainly the busiest you will come across.  Attractions include the Skytower, the ViaductBasin, various museums and possibly a day out to WaihekeIsland.  The ViaductBasin was built to host the Americas Cup a few years ago – and there are Americas Cup yachts in the basin that offer sailing trips out into the Hauraki Gulf.

Two nights Auckland

Day 3: Bay of Islands

The very northern tip of the NorthIsland is well worth a visit. The towns of Paihia and Russell are on opposite sides of the estuary, and from a base here, you might like to explore CapeReinga and Ninety-mileBeach. The Waitangi Treaty was signed near Paihia.

Three nights Bay of Islands

Day 6: Coromandel Peninsula

Coming south through Auckland, and then to the east is the Coromandel Peninsula.  This is home to Hot Water Beach and Cathedral Cove, and has some lovely scenery, with rain forest in the central spine.  There is some old mining history here for those interested, and good sea fishing as well.

Two nights Coromandel

Day 8: Rotorua

Rotorua was the original tourist destination in the 1800’s, featuring the extraordinary pink and white terraces, which were destroyed in a volcanic eruption in the 1880’s.  Visit the Museum where you can learn about the devastating eruption, followed by a visit to Te Puia, the Maori Arts and Craft Centre.  Te Puia is also home to Whakawerawera thermal reserve.  Follow this with a visit to the BuriedVillage – the remains of the devastation of the 1880’s, and finally LakeTarawera.  There are also a number of other thermal parks around the area.

Two nights Rotorua

Day 10: Napier

Hawke Bay is surrounded by a circle of rugged hills, giving it its unique micro-climate, and making it the perfect location for vineyards and market gardens.  CapeKidnappers is here, if birds are of interest to you and there are some good views to be had from Te Mata Peak.  Napier itself suffered a major earthquake in the 1930’s and was rebuilt in Art Deco style.

Two nights Napier

Day 12: Wellington

This is the capital city and apart from the parliament buildings and botanical gardens, it is also home to the wonderful Te Papa Museum. It is also a unique building in that the foundations are built like a sponge and sit squarely on a major fault.  They are built to withstand quite a sizeable tremor.

Two nights Wellington

Day 14: Abel Tasman National Park

Take the ferry across to Picton on the South Island, and drive around to Abel Taman. This northern tip of the South Island is so often overlooked, but it is one of our favourites.  It is here that you’ll see the crescent shaped beaches backed by lush greenery – easy to spend a full day in the park, using the water taxis to get about, and perhaps walking one of the many trails in the park.

Three nights Abel Tasman

Day 17: Punakaiki

Coming down the west coast, it is nice to break the journey with an overnight stop at Punakaiki.  This is the home of the Pancake Rocks – a strange rock formation, and the overnight stop simply allows you to take your time as these roads are so scenic that you will simply have to keep stopping for more pictures.

One night Punakaiki

Day 18: Arthurs Pass

Turning inland to the central spine of mountains that run through the South Island, this is alpine scenery at its very best.  There are plenty of walking opportunities in the area with stunning views all around.

Two nights Arthurs Pass

Day 20: Fox Glacier and Franz Josef

Returning to the west coast, the next place of interest are the two glaciers of Franz Josef and Fox Glacier.  Take time to visit one or both glaciers, the beautiful LakeMatheson and the dramatic coast at GillespieBeach.  From here also, you can take a sightseeing flight, with or without a glacier landing and hike, and hopefully good views of Mount Cook.

Two nights Fox Glacier

Day 22: Wanaka

The route to Wanaka takes you through the HaastPass and past Lakes Wanaka and Hawea.  Simply beautiful – this little town is surrounded by mountains and is the Queenstown of yesteryear.  Where Queenstown has developed, Wanaka has remained delightfully small.

One night Wanaka

Day 23: Te Anau

Te Anau is the gateway to FjordlandNational Park – for both Milford and Doubtful Sounds. For either, you can visit for a day, or take an overnight cruise. Of the two, Milford offers the more dramatic scenery but is busier. Doubtful Sound has fewer tourists and lovely scenery, but it’s not quite so dramatic.

Two nights Te Anau

Day 25: Queenstown

Sitting on the shores of Lake Wakatipu, Queenstown is a sizeable town with activities for every adrenalin junkie!  Here you will find bungy jumping, sky diving, a luge and plenty more.  Much of the Lord of the Rings was filmed in this area, and although the sets had to be removed, the scenery will seem familiar!  For those not into extreme sports, a drive to Glenorchy is beautiful.

Two nights Queenstown

Day 27: Lake Tekapo

This is the home of the Church of the Good Shepherd and the Collie Dog Memorial often features in brochures. This is also a great place for stargazing as it is a ‘designated dark sky’ area.

One night Lake Tekapo

Day 28: Christchurch

Coming further north is the city of Christchurch. After the earthquakes of recent years Christchurch is still rebuilding, but is still well worth a stay. Punt along the river, visit the botanical gardens or take a tram ride around the town centre. Unique attractions to pop up since the earthquakes include Re:Start – a shopping centre comprised of shipping containers, and the Cardboard Cathedral.

One night Christchurch

Day 28: Depart New Zealand

Lake Tekapo

Courtesy of Angie Watson

Mount Cook New Zealand

Courtesy of Angie Watson

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A stunning lodge in Arthurs Pass called Wilderness Lodge is a real treat and a highlight – located in stunning Alpine scenery and with friendly hosts that are incredibly knowledgeable about the local flora and fauna.

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New Zealand: Are You A North Island Kiwi Or A South Island Kiwi?

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There is a peculiar myth associated with travelling to New Zealand. This myth being that the island upon which you first arrive will be the one that you fall in love with. Of course, when you’re planning tailor made holidays to somewhere like New Zealand, you probably want to see and experience the best of all that the country has to offer. However, North Island New Zealand and South Island New Zealand are distinctly different.

Photo courtesy of Angie Watson

Photo courtesy of Angie Watson

Arriving in the North Island, travellers are met by the familiar cosmopolitan city airs of either Auckland or Wellington. One a windy city and one a harbour side city of sails daringly resting atop 47 naturally capped volcanoes, both Wellington and Auckland are visually stunning and culturally iconic cities in their own right. However, arriving at either as part of package tours or tailor made holidays to New Zealand, people sample New Zealand’s social and cosmopolitan atmosphere, prior to the Land of The Long White Cloud’s unspoiled natural magnificence.

Alternatively then, when one arrives in South Island New Zealand, one is met with much smaller city sizes, where New Zealand’s awe inspiring natural ruggedness really is just a stone’s throw in any given direction. Much more laid back, new Zealand’s South Island is home to a total population equivalent to just a quarter of that of the city of Auckland. Likewise, distances between destinations are markedly increased.

Of course, people planning self drive tailor made holidays to New Zealand will fall in love immediately with South Island’s epic expanses of mountain ranges and impenetrable bush. However, while the north of the South Island is renowned for almost year round sunshine, the South Island itself is markedly different from the North in that coastal areas especially are much more rugged and in many cases only accessible by short hiking trails.

Looking to experience the best of both islands? Itineraries which focus on facilitating tailor made holidays which sample both islands are perfect for travellers with enough time on their hands. The only question is, will where you initially arrive affect your choice of favourite island?        

New Zealand in 3 Weeks

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An itinerary idea for spending three weeks in New Zealand.  The land of the long white cloud, two main islands that hold such appeal and rightly so.  This itinerary offers a three week option, but if time allows, do stretch your time to four weeks – you won’t regret it:

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New Zealand in 3 weeks

The land of the long white cloud, two main islands that hold such appeal and rightly so.  This itinerary offers a three week option, but if time allows, do stretch your time to four weeks – you won’t regret it:

Day 1: Auckland
Day 2: Coromandel Peninsula
Day 4: Rotorua
Day 6: Napier
Day 8: Wellington
Day 9: Abel Tasman Park
Day 12: Punakaiki
Day 13: Fox Glacier
Day 15: Wanaka
Day 16: Te Anau
Day 18: Queenstown
Day 20: Lake Tekapo
Day 21: Christchurch
Day 22: Depart Christchurch

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A volcanic land of mountains, fjords, and glaciers, white sandy beaches, cosmopolitan cities, romantic hide-aways, the land of the Lord of the Rings , the Bungy Jump and the white knuckle jet-boat ride. The land of immaculate vineyards and fine cuisine; New Zealand, technically half way around the world, metaphorically just around the corner – a land so beautiful it is impossible not to fall in love again and again.

Here is one idea for a 3 week self-drive itinerary, covering the North and South Islands. 4 weeks would be even better; there is so much to see in this beautiful country.

Day 1: Auckland
Arrive in Auckland, City of Sails, taking time to climb the Sky Tower for fantastic views of the downtown skyline, harbour, bridge and surrounding hills. Auckland is built on an isthmus, a narrow of finger of land surrounded by water. Of the 3.8 million population of New Zealand, approx. one third live in Auckland and whilst it is not the nation’s capital, it is the most cosmopolitan of all cities and a past host for the Americas Cup Challenge.
One night Auckland

Day 2: Coromandel Peninsula
Collect your hire car and head south today, through Auckland and on to the Coromandel Peninsula; a delightful coastline. Dig your own thermal bath on Hot Water Beach.
Two nights Coromandel Peninsula

If time allows, a visit to the Waitomo Caves at Hamilton is interesting for their abundance of glow worms. If you feel energetic, see the glow worms on a full day abseiling and tubing excursion.

Day 4: Rotorua
Today’s journey takes you through the Bay of Plenty area to Rotorua. One of the original Tourist attractions in the mid 19th Century, the once famous pink and white terraces were destroyed in a volcanic eruption. The area has re-gained its popularity as the centre of geo-thermal activity. Visit the museum, take time out to visit the Maori Arts and Crafts Institute and the Whakawerawera hot pools, geyser and bubbling mud.
Two nights Rotorua

Day 6: Napier
Follow the Thermal Explorer Highway to Lake Taupo, the largest in the country, taking a quick look at the Huka Falls en route. Continue towards Napier. The route crosses the mountains that contain Hawkes’ Bay and brings you to Napier, famous for its Art Deco style and wonderful vineyards.
Two nights Napier

Day 8: Wellington
Today’s drive takes you through the Central Plateau area .Your destination is Wellington, New Zealand’s Capital city on the southern tip of the North Island. Visit the Te Papa Museum a wonderfully informative and hands on museum. Explore the Kapiti Coastline.
One night Wellington

With more time available consider including the Taranaki area to your itinerary

Day 09: Abel Tasman National Park
Drop your car this morning at the ferry terminal in Wellington and take the Inter-Islander ferry across the Cook Straits to Picton on the South Island. The second part of the journey takes you through Marlborough Sound – a wonderful introduction to the South Island. If time permits, take the Queen Charlotte Drive eventually arriving in Nelson. The Abel Tasman Park is not far from Nelson – if you feel energetic, drive to the Park entrance and take a water taxi up the coast. The taxi will arrange to pick you up at a given time giving you several hours (or days) to hike the well marked trails.
Three nights Nelson

Day 12: Punakaiki
Coming down the west coast, stop overnight in Punakaiki. This is the home of the Pancake Rocks – a strange rock formation, and the overnight stop simply allows you to take your time as these roads are so scenic that you will simply have to keep stopping for more pictures.
One night Punakaiki

Day 13: Fox Glacier
Continuing down the coast to Fox  and Franz Josef Glaciers. Weather and time permitting, take a scenic flight around Mount Cook or visit the highly informative Visitor Centre to learn about the glacier and its formation.
Two nights Fox Glacier

Day 15: Wanaka
The journey today takes you over the Haast Pass to lovely Lake Wanaka. Simply beautiful – this little town is surrounded by mountains and is the Queenstown of yesteryear.
One night Wanaka

Day 16: Te Anau
Te Anau is the gateway to Fjordland National Park – for both Milford and Doubtful Sounds. For either, you can visit for a day or take an overnight cruise. Of the two, Milford offers the most dramatic scenery, but Doubtful is the quieter with fewer visitors.
Two nights Te Anau

Day 18: Queenstown
Sitting on the shores of Lake Wakatipu, Queenstown is a sizeable town with activities for every adrenalin junkie! Here you will find bungee jumping, sky diving, a luge and plenty more. Much of the Lord of the Rings was filmed in this area, and although the sets had to be removed, the scenery will seem familiar. For those not into extreme sports, a drive to Glenorchy is beautiful.
Two nights Queenstown

Day 19: Lake Tekapo
North to Lake Tekapo and a visit to the Mount Cook National Park. This is also a great place for stargazing.
One night Lake Tekapo

Day 20: Christchurch
Return today to Christchurch for your final night. This most English of cities is compact and easy to navigate. A central hotel brings you within walking distance of the main city centre attractions. With a little more time, take a trip up to Kaikoura – a sleepy little seaside town world famous for whale watching.
One night Christchurch

Day 22: Depart Christchurch
Return to the airport for your onward or homeward flight.

New Zealand

Picture courtesy of New Zealand Tourism

Auckland

Picture courtesy of Chris McLennan

New Zealand

Picture courtesy of Erehwon Colin and Pearl Frankling

Wanaka

Picture courtesy of Jim bell

Wellington

Photo courtesy of Rob Suisted

 

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