• Sydney Australia - credit Jackie Appleton

Spend some time in Nairobi, Kenya

Posted on:
Posted by:

Vicki Tester

 

Most people that travel to Kenya arrive early in the morning and shoot off on safari or perhaps take a night to recover from their flight before heading out. But it is well worth stopping a few days to explore what this city has to offer.

Nairobi National Park

Even if your visit to Kenya is limited to Nairobi you can still enjoy the country’s spectacular wildlife with a visit to this swath of wilderness just 15 minutes outside the city centre.

The 117 km square of protected space is home to lions, leopard, rhinos, cheetahs, zebras, hippos, gazelle, and a healthy collection of other species including over 400 different types of birds. The park can be easily navigated with a tour where you can explore the savannah and forests too.

At the Athi River hippo pool on the south western edge of the park you can stretch your legs and take a walk accompanied by an armed ranger who will not only protect you from feisty critters but can tell you a bit about what you’re seeing.

Picture courtesy of Peter Ellis

Picture courtesy of Peter Ellis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Animal Orphanage

Located at the entrance to Nairobi National Park, the orphanage is home to those animals that have been abandoned, confiscated from illegal traffickers or injured and unable to survive in the wild. It is a great place to learn about the different species.

Picture courtesy of Peter Ellis

Picture courtesy of Peter Ellis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Langata Giraffe Centre
The Langata Giraffe Centre, run by the African Fund for Endangered Wildlife, is a sanctuary for the rare Rothschilds giraffe. Here you can observe, hand-feed or even kiss the giraffes from a raised circular wooden structure, and it is quite an experience. It’s a good place to get the close-up photographs.

For those of an adventurous nature, you could even stay at the Giraffe Manor for the night and have these wonderful animals as very close neighbours.

Picture courtesy of Peter Ellis

Picture courtesy of Peter Ellis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kenya’s National Museum and Snake Park

If you want to see the stuffed remains of the Man-eaters of Tsavo, or learn about this diverse and fascinating country’s history and geography, then the Museum is a must. You will easily loose half a day here.

In the grounds of the National Museum, there’s a recreated Kikuyu homestead and a Snake Park, where you can see black mambas, snakes of all types, some sad-looking crocodiles and giant dudus (creepy crawlies).

All in all, Nairobi should not be rushed – there is much to see and do here.

Picture courtesy of Peter Ellis

Picture courtesy of Peter Ellis

Picture courtesy of Peter Ellis

Picture courtesy of Peter Ellis

A little gem – Pumba Private Game Reserve

Posted on:
Posted by:

Vicki Tester

 

We’ve been thinking about ‘little gems’ in the office – places or experiences that provide a ‘wow factor’ of some kind during a holiday. For me (Angie), several come to mind and below is one of them.

Pumba Private Game Reserve is located on the Eastern Cape of South Africa, and works perfectly at the end of a self-drive holiday from Cape Town and along the Garden Route. The Eastern Cape has a number of game reserves, which have the advantage of being malaria free, but what makes Pumba stand out over the others is that it is home to the rare white lion.

 

White Lions pumba

Picture courtesy of Angie Watson

 

A recessive gene gives white lions their unusual colour, making them appear even more majestic than a tawny lion. Easier to spot, the white lion cannot rely on camouflage when hunting – which makes it harder for this beautiful animal to survive in the wild. Luckily for Pumba’s pride, a couple of years ago a female gave birth to not only white cubs, but also a tawny cub. This tawny lion will be integral for the survival of the pride – whilst the white lion distracts the game, the tawny lion will pounce.  

There are two lodges within the game reserve. Bush Lodge is built in front of a waterhole, which attracts a wide range of animals. During my stay, a whole herd of elephants came to visit, with the babies playing in and around the water. The accommodations are of an exceptional standard, with outdoor showers and private plunge pools. 

The second property is Water Lodge – accommodations are of the same standard but slightly different in style, and still with outdoor showers and private plunge pools. The lodge overlooks Lake Kariega, which is a regular haunt for hippo and good for bass fishing too.

 All in all, Pumba Private Game Reserve offers an incredibly special experience, and one that I would highly recommend! For more information, give us a call on 01323 446550 or email us at info@experienceholidays.co.uk.

Pumba water lodge - lake

Picture courtesy of Angie Watson

Elephants at Pumba

Picture courtesy of Angie Watson

 

 

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